Archive for September, 2007

I want to read this book. :)

hot_mama.jpgDear Civilians,

It has come to my attention there is an ongoing debate about the greatest superhero of all time. Batman. Spider-Man. Wonder Woman, Wolverine. All of them have their fans and detractors, their champions and critics.

Well, I’m here to put an end to this silly confusion once and for all. Because I’m fun, I’m fabulous, and I am the greatest superhero alive. Period.

My name? Fiera. Protector of the innocent. Superhero du jour. And all-around fabulous individual.

My powers, you ask? Superstrength, for one. And I’ve got a temper to match my fire-wielding abilities. I punch and flambe my way through the ubervillains and other evil doers who want to take over the city of Bigtime, New York.

By night, I’m also a member of the Fearless Five, the greatest superhero team ever to roam the streets of Bigtime. Right now, we’re hot on the trail of Siren and Intelligal, who villains bent on taking over the city. Not on my watch, they won’t. Also making a pest of himself is Johnny Angel, who wants revenge on the ubervillains for killing his predecessor. Angel’s not a bad guy, but he should know better than to get in my way. No matter how sexy he is.

In real life, I’m Fiona Fine, one of Bigtime’s premier fashion designers. I’m known for my bold choice of colors, fabrics, and patterns. My couture clothes, of course, are to die for.

You can read more about my adventures and general fabulousness in the latest Bigtime book from Jennifer Estep, appropriately titled Hot Mama (Berkley Trade; Nov. 6, 2007; $14; ISBN-10: 0425217345; ISBN-13: 978-0425217344).

Sweet girl, Jennifer. Although she could so use a fashion makeover. The girl is way too fond of cutesy T-shirts, and she doesn’t even own a pair of stilettos. Poor thing. She’s so misguided … 

Warmly,

Fiera aka Fiona Fine

Member of the Fearless Five

Protector of the innocent

Superhero du jour

As dictated to Jennifer Estep (who will never, ever wear a pair of stilettos)

September 13, 2007 at 3:52 pm 5 comments

Threadless?

Looking for a new t-shirt? Look no further than Threadless.com.

The Young Explorers Society shirt is perfect for the armchair traveler.

Fairy tale enthusiasts will appreciate “Moral of the Story” and “Parable Paranoia”:

And if you get the pun in the next shirt, you are obviously my kind of people:

This is just kind of beautiful:

 

September 13, 2007 at 12:50 pm 2 comments

Interesting Things in teh Intrawebz

Funny… the exact same thing happened to me last time I made a handmade book! (No, really. You’ve got to watch that. Click it. Seriously.)

What a neat medium for writing!

There are, to my knowledge, two electronic collections of global libraries are gathering. The grander of the two is the Librophiliac Love Letter, collecting the “world’s most beautiful libraries.” Closer to home is Kimbooktu’s Your Home Library page, where booklovers send in photographs of their own bookspaces. I am looking forward to submitting my own picture, but haven’t yet because my library is being used as an impromptu laundry room right now. You should definitely send in a picture of yours!

Kimbooktu is also collecting links to book blogs, so if you keep one, let her know.

Craig detailMelissa Jay Craig, who makes beautiful, ethereal sculptural books, has posted her most recent work. It’s all toadstools! I’m just sort of in love… my family has always said that they found me under a toadstool, and if I were going to live under a toadstool, these would be the toadstools I would pick. 🙂

Take a minute to check out the Rag & Bone Blog’s coverage of Chris Natrop’s beautiful work, with photos.

What a nice, simple, elegant, wonderful idea: plant a tree for every book you read. It costs a dollar per book/tree.

Book Patrol shares a picture of one of the most fun bookshops I’ve ever seen.

Did you know that when you refer to something as a thingamabob, you may require a brisk soapy washing of the mouth?

Ah, what a difference a vowel makes:

phobia

For those of you who are writers, these Keyboard Characters might liven up your desktop and provide you with a little uncritical company.

Okay, that’s enough for now. Happy surfing!

September 11, 2007 at 11:25 pm 3 comments

A Place to Write

September 11, 2007 at 8:20 am 3 comments

Prep for NaNoWriMo?

toothpaste for dinner

toothpastefordinner.com

I’m a Municipal Liaison for NaNoWriMo, but I know I don’t have time to novel this year. It sucks. I guess I’m going to have to give it up, and that’s just a very sad thing.

September 10, 2007 at 7:19 pm 2 comments

My Swiftly Tilting Planet

  

There are some books we read when we are young – transcendent books, books that resonate and reverberate, that hit us as we fly through the outer space of intellectual and emotional growth and forever alter our orbits. Among these books, for millions of people, were Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time and The Wind in the Door. (The others in the storyline were tremendous as well, but for me, it was these two that struck and shifted me.) I think maybe everyone has read Wrinkle, with its pantheon of fantastic characters: the madames Whatsit, Who, and Which; telepathic children; bodiless sadistic brains; tentacled caregivers; Happy Mediums; flying centaurs; and the incomparably brave and human Meg. Wind was less widely-read, but to me even more poignant with its “drive of dragons” (the cherubim), mitochondriae, and Echthroi, and the fight to save Meg’s extraordinary little brother.

lengleL’Engle’s books were brilliant, and she utterly refused to treat her readers like little children who required easy ideas and easy words. She is known for having argued that children’s books are literature far too complicated to be understood by adults – and, especially in her case, she was right. Her books are packed with philosophy and science – we’re talking quantum physics and microbiology here, not sixth grade earth science – theology, existential exploration, good, evil, death, and the kind of characters and relationships that we feel lucky to encounter in adult lit.

A Wrinkle in Time starts with “It was a dark and stormy night,” and upon reading it we feel that it is the quintessential dark and stormy night, the one that started it all, the one that started everything. In Wrinkle, it isn’t cliche – it’s reassuring, and breath-taking, and signals you right from the beginning that now things are going to happen.

I don’t think I could possibly explain how these books impacted me. If you read them when you were a child, then probably you understand without my saying. If you didn’t, I doubt I could ever make it clear.

Madeleine L’Engle, who modeled Meg after herself, passed away this past Thursday at the age of 88.

She started writing at five, won an award in fifth grade and was accused of plaigarism. She conceived of her best work on camping trips. She loved her books, her family, her pets, and her characters. Much of her life was not like mine has been, but these things are so like me that I can’t help but feel a kindred, a connection. It is another layer of my admiration for a woman whose words built and shook worlds.

I pull the following quote – L’Engle’s – from the close of the NY Times eulogy:

“Why does anybody tell a story?” Ms. L’Engle once asked, even though she knew the answer.

“It does indeed have something to do with faith,” she said, “faith that the universe has meaning, that our little human lives are not irrelevant, that what we choose or say or do matters, matters cosmically.”

Thank you, Madeleine, for these gifts.

September 8, 2007 at 6:05 pm 2 comments

Halloween Costume?

Not for me, but maybe for someone! 🙂 Slighty “naughty” (but SFW) so the picture is behind a cut.

(more…)

September 1, 2007 at 8:12 am 3 comments


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